Tag Archives: Native American rock art

To Albuquerque and Back Again, Part 2: Petroglyphs National Monument

As I look with dismay upon the months elapsed since I last posted to this blog, I am reminded of French philosopher Jean Paul Sartre‘s insights on people’s relationships to the stories we tell about our lives. In his book Nausea Sartre writes,

This is what I thought: for the most banal even to become an adventure, you must (and this is enough) begin to recount it. This is what fools people: a man is always a teller of tales, he sees everything that happens to him through them; and he tries to live his own life as if he were telling a story.

But you have to choose: live or tell.

In my silence we find evidence that I have chosen to live.  In doing so, I left you, dear Reader, behind, and now it’s (long past) time to catch you up with all that has happened since our last visit together.

My travel last March to Albuquerque, New Mexico, focused on exploring the histories and cultures of the Puebloan peoples. The day after my tour of the Acoma Pueblo (near the town of Grant an hour or so west of ABQ), I hiked the Rinconada Canyon trail of Petroglyphs National Monument. This federally protected area, located along ABQ’s westward city limits, actually consists of four disconnected areas where petroglyphs may be found.  The Rinconada Canyon trail skirts a steep hillside strewn with large boulders and the cliffs from which they fell, before looping back across open desert to the parking area.  Examples of rock art may be seen all along the outbound side of the loop with the largest concentration of images, so we heard, situated just before the trail turns away from the hillside.  My friend and I made it nearly that far before needing to turn back, but despite missing this grand gallery we were still thrilled by all the glyphs we did find.  You can see some of what we saw in the slide show below.


Petroglyph National Monument – Images by Jennifer Nelson

Created by Pueblo people over the centuries, these petroglyphs served various functions. Some marked water sources along established trade routes; others warned of dangerous creatures, like rattlesnakes, lurking among the trail-side rocks; still others promoted the clan affiliations of those who traveled along a route that extended deep into the land we now call Mexico. Many glyphs served ritual purposes and now provide windows into the spiritual beliefs of Puebloan cultures. As reminders of communal practices lived closer to the land than our modern, urbanized way of life, perhaps these rock art images challenge us to imagine how we might reform our society to restore the planet we have damaged and how we might once again attune ourselves to receive the Creator’s many gifts.